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Sports are Changing Education


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Every year, thousands of teenagers move to the United States from all over the world, for all kinds of reasons. Sports are a big deal here in the US than they are in other countries. This difference hardly ever comes up in domestic debates about America’s international mediocrity in education. Nine out of 10 foreign students who had lived in the U.S. said that kids here cared more about sports than their friends back home. In other countries Korea’s, Finland and Germany, many kids play club sports outside of school.

Most schools do not have the staff, manage, transport, insure, or glorify sports teams Like most other Americans, there are many benefits of high-school sports for example its exercise, lessons in sportsmanship and perseverance, school spirit, and just plain fun But, in 2012, only 17% of the school’s juniors and seniors took at least one AP class or test compared to the 50% of students who played school sports which is basically saying sports are  taking over the education in school, The actual learning part. The U.S education budgets are lowering as more kids play on traveling teams outside of school, and as the globalized economy demands that children learn higher-order skills so they can compete down the line, We really need reevaluate the American sporting tradition.

At one time, the United States was starting to educate its children for more years than most other countries, even while admitting a surge of immigrants. People feared that all this schooling learning would make boys soft and weak, in contrast to their brawny, newly immigrated peers. Sports, would both protect boys’ masculinity and distract them from vices like gambling and prostitution. “Muscular Christianity,” fashionable during the Victorian era, prescribed sports as a sort of moral vaccine against the tumult of rapid economic growth.

Athletics succeeded in distracting not just students but entire communities. As athletic fields became the centers of towns across America, educators became coaches and parents became boosters. From the beginning, some detractors questioned whether tax money should be spent on activities that could damage the brain, and occasionally leave students dead on the field or spend more money on the education of students and not worry about them dying from fun.

In 1909, New York City superintendents decided to abolish football, and people predicted that soccer would become the second sport of choice City officials reversed course the next year, allowing football with the rules revised.

The National Collegiate Athletic Association had emerged by this time, as a means of reforming the increasingly brutal sport of college football. But the enforcers were unable to keep pace with the industry.

Once television exponentially expanded the fan base in the mid-20th century, collegiate sports gained a spiritual and economic choke hold on America. College scholarships rewarded high-school athletes, and the search for the next star player trickled down even to grade school. As more and more Americans attended college, growing ranks of alumni demanded winning teams—and university presidents found their reputations shaped by the success of their football and basketball programs.

In the end, we need to start focusing on school’s original purpose; education. Yes, athletics may help some students with being bored, keeping grades up, stress management, and getting in to colleges with scholarship. However, only about 2% of high school athletes are granted athletic scholarships every year, and most of those are not full rides.  In addition, only 1.7% of college football players and 0.08%  of high school players play at any professional level.

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Sports are Changing Education